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Investment

September 1, 2003

The European Private Banking Services Survey 2003 set out to examine the relationship between European private banks and family businesses, and reveal some of the strengths and weaknesses within.

Summary
The European Private Banking Services Survey 2003 set out to examine the relationship between European private banks and family businesses, and reveal some of the strengths and weaknesses within. From the results contained in this report, we hope to provide private banks with fodder to strengthen the link between what they offer families and what families say they want. Conversely, we hope the results will encourage families to question the service they currently receive with a view to maximising it.

September 1, 2003

For an industry that makes money from good relationships, the professionals that create and maintain private banking and family business client relationships are key. Melanie Stern examines the sector’s frontline

Melanie Stern is Section Editor of Families in Business magazine.

For an industry that makes money from good relationships, the professionals that create and maintain private banking and family business client relationships are key. Melanie Stern examines the sector's frontline

"Our greatest asset is our people" – how frequently we hear this from the business world. Not all the proponents of this popular phrase manage to prove their commitment to it, but for the private banking industry, people are among the greatest assets.

September 1, 2003

The European private banking industry is now split between enterprising corporates and smaller, traditional players; lack of dynamism has retarded competitive spirit in the latter while the former established its domination. Time to get busy, says Melanie Stern

Melanie Stern is Section Editor of Families in Business magazine.

The European private banking industry is now split between enterprising corporates and smaller, traditional players; lack of dynamism has retarded competitive spirit in the latter while the former established its domination. Time to get busy, says Melanie Stern

September 1, 2003

Lausanne is widely acknowledged to be the family business capital of the world. With two major educational centres located there, IMD and the FBN, family businesses can feel assured that their educational and networking needs will all be met

Barbara Murray is Executive Director, the Family Business Network.
Joachim Schwass is Director, the IMD – Lombard Odier Darier Hentsch Family Business Center.
John Ward is the Wild Group Professor of Family Business at IMD (Switzerland).

Lausanne is widely acknowledged to be the family business capital of the world. With two major educational centres located there, IMD and the FBN, family businesses can feel assured that their educational and networking needs will all be met

September 1, 2003

Through its ongoing research surveys, Grant Thornton has examined family businesses in 26 countries around the world, exploring their views and concerns and providing a snapshot of over 8,700 business owners worldwide.

Carlo Marelli has been a member of the board and CEO of an internationally operating family business in Switzerland for many years and has gained extensive experience and knowledge, becoming a specialist in dealing with the specific issues that face family businesses.

June 1, 2003

Big business or big bucks is the choice presented to a family business through mergers and acquisitions, depending on how it views its future. Melanie Stern explains how the challenges faced by this sector proves that size has never mattered more in either case

Melanie Stern is Section Editor of Families in Business magazine.

Big business or big bucks is the choice presented to a family business through mergers and acquisitions, depending on how it views its future. Melanie Stern explains how the challenges faced by this sector proves that size has never mattered more in either case

June 1, 2003

At a time when banks are increasingly cautious about lending money, the stock market can be an attractive alternative source of capital for a family business – and, explains Georges van Erck, an IPO need not mean the family loses control of the business

Georges van Erck is Managing Director at JPMorgan, London. He has more than 30 years of investment banking experience, most of which have been spent providing corporate finance services to family-owned companies.

At a time when banks are increasingly cautious about lending money, the stock market can be an attractive alternative source of capital for a family business – and, explains Georges van Erck, an IPO need not mean the family loses control of the business

June 1, 2003

There were 30,000 insolvencies in Germany last year and family businesses are finding it harder to procure credit from banks with their increasingly stringent lending criteria. Private equity managers may be the answer to a tailor-made financial strategy, explains Max Burger-Calderon

Max Burger-Calderon is a partner with Apax
Partners Group and is also chairman of the EVCA (European Venture Capital Association).

There were 30,000 insolvencies in Germany last year and family businesses are finding it harder to procure credit from banks with their increasingly stringent lending criteria. Private equity managers may be the answer to a tailor-made financial strategy, explains Max Burger-Calderon

June 1, 2003

While global IPO and share market returns languish at historical lows, venture capitalists could step in as family business capital providers – but both sides need to work on their perceptions of one another to build a successful marriage, says Melanie Stern

Melanie Stern is Section Editor of Families in Business magazine.

While global IPO and share market returns languish at historical lows, venture capitalists could step in as family business capital providers – but both sides need to work on their perceptions of one another to build a successful marriage, says Melanie Stern

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