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Investment

November 1, 2006

Suzy bibko is editor of Families in Business.

September 1, 2006

Asian family business are returning some of their globally-made fortunes to good causes back home, fueling a growing philanthropic sector in Asia. Michael Yeoh reports on the business families who traditionally preserved their wealth for family

Michael Yeoh is founder, executive director and chief executive officer of the Asian Strategy & Leadership Institute (ASLI) and the ASLI Foundation, based in Kuala Lumpur.

Asian family business are returning some of their globally-made fortunes to good causes back home, fueling a growing philanthropic sector in Asia. Michael Yeoh reports on the business families who traditionally preserved their wealth for family

September 1, 2006

At 72 years of age, Nils Larson thought it was too soon to begin the transition of his family’s publishing house to the fourth generation.

At 72 years of age, Nils Larson thought it was too soon to begin the transition of his family's publishing house to the fourth generation. He believed no-one in the business was qualified to take over his duties as publisher and CEO. Despite the urgings of family members on the company's board, Mr Larson took solace in the fact that his good friend and general practice attorney, Fred Wertheimer, was not pressing him to act.

July 1, 2006

Instilling a sense of ‘giving’ into the next generation can release a passion and bring with it a motivation. Joachim Schwass explains why this is the ideal tool for linking the younger generation to both the business and the family’s values

Joachim Schwass  is Professor of Family Business at IMD and Co-Director of the Leading the Family Business programme.

Instilling a sense of 'giving' into the next generation can release a passion and bring with it a motivation. Joachim Schwass explains why this is the ideal tool for linking the younger generation to both the business and the family's values

July 1, 2006

In the fourth of an occasional series, Melanie Stern chairs a roundtable discussion at Campden’s Family Investment Workshop in Lausanne on whether family offices are more interested in preserving wealth, or maximising it – and how they fulfil their mandate

In the fourth of an occasional series, Melanie Stern chairs a roundtable discussion at Campden's Family Investment Workshop in Lausanne on whether family offices are more interested in preserving wealth, or maximising it – and how they fulfil their mandate

Roundtable panel

Gero Bauknecht is manager and executive board member of Beekay Family Office, a single family office in Zurich.

July 1, 2006

Russia’s wealthy business families want to lead a foundation culture. But the shadow of socialist rule and the grip of the Kremlin are just two of the many hurdles that potential philanthropists need to overcome, finds Melanie Stern

Melanie Stern is section editor of Families in Business.

Russia's wealthy business families want to lead a foundation culture. But the shadow of socialist rule and the grip of the Kremlin are just two of the many hurdles that potential philanthropists need to overcome, finds Melanie Stern

July 1, 2006

European family businesses are less unionised than their non-family counterparts. This is not a good strategy for family businesses in a competitive landscape, says Trygve Gulbrandsen, who finds Scandinavia a model for change in the field

Trygve Gulbrandsen is senior researcher at Institute for Social Research in Oslo, Norway, and professor of sociology at Department of Sociology and Human Geography at the University of Oslo.

European family businesses are less unionised than their non-family counterparts. This is not a good strategy for family businesses in a competitive landscape, says Trygve Gulbrandsen, who finds Scandinavia a model for change in the field

July 1, 2006

There’s money to be made from globalisation. Thematic investing allows business families to look at the financial world in a new light, taking advantage of the emerging markets and changing macroeconomic trends. Eric Sarasin explains how business families can profit

Eric Sarasin is head of private banking at Bank Sarasin in Switzerland, and a member of the bank's founding family.

There's money to be made from globalisation. Thematic investing allows business families to look at the financial world in a new light, taking advantage of the emerging markets and changing macroeconomic trends. Eric Sarasin explains how business families can profit

July 1, 2006

Starting with virtually nothing in the 1940s, the Jacobson family built an industrial distribution empire now worth over $3 billion. Suzy Bibko discusses the challenges of the business and the creation of its family investment firms

Suzy Bibko is editor of Families in Business.

Starting with virtually nothing in the 1940s, the Jacobson family built an industrial distribution empire now worth over $3 billion. Suzy Bibko discusses the challenges of the business and the creation of its family investment firms

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