Vimeo
LinkedIn
Instagram
Share |

succession

May 1, 2005

Family members should be encouraged to gradually take on responsibility in running the business as soon as they are able to work – so when the time is ripe for succession, the company will flourish rather than wither on the vine, writes James Hutcheson

James Olan Hutcheson is founder and president of Regeneration Partners. jim@regeneration-partners.com

Family members should be encouraged to gradually take on responsibility in running the business as soon as they are able to work – so when the time is ripe for succession, the company will flourish rather than wither on the vine, writes James Hutcheson

May 1, 2005

Employing family members can be fraught with problems, but, argue John Ward and Steve Waichler, if it’s done with care and there is a good training and reward system in place, loyalty and commitment can strengthen your company and give it an edge

Steve Waichler is a director of Follett and president of the Waichler Family Council. John Ward is Wild Group professor of Family Business at IMD in Switzerland. www.johnlward.com

Employing family members can be fraught with problems, but, argue John Ward and Steve Waichler, if it's done with care and there is a good training and reward system in place, loyalty and commitment can strengthen your company and give it an edge

May 1, 2005

To prepare your heirs to take the reins of your family business, you must start early and be more of a mentor than a boss. Karen Vinton believes that a light touch and plenty of encouragement are the best way to reap satisfying dividends from willing offspring

Karen Vinton is a family business consultant with Vinton Consulting Services in Gallatin Gateway, Montana

To prepare your heirs to take the reins of your family business, you must start early and be more of a mentor than a boss. Karen Vinton believes that a light touch and plenty of encouragement are the best way to reap satisfying dividends from willing offspring

March 1, 2005

Fouad (Fred) H is a self-made man. He arrived in Montreal from Lebanon in the late 1950s at the age of 23 with $150 in his pocket and a pregnant wife, Nieves, whom he met while on vacation in Spain.

Fouad (Fred) H is a self-made man. He arrived in Montreal from Lebanon in the late 1950s at the age of 23 with $150 in his pocket and a pregnant wife, Nieves, whom he met while on vacation in Spain. He took a job as a messenger at a local pharmacy and was able to save enough money to buy his first fashion jewellery shop. Forty years later he had built a large empire with over 65 stores across Canada – with affiliations in the US.

March 1, 2005

As small family businesses evolve into multi-national corporations, the third and fourth generations can tend to feel distanced from the central management of the company. An annual ‘cousins’ consortium’ can help maintain harmony, explain Bonnie Brown and Chester Weber

Bonnie M Brown is President of Transition Dynamics Inc. www.transitiondynamicsinc.com. chester E weber  is an associate of Wealthbridge Partners. www.wealthbridgepartners.com

As small family businesses evolve into multi-national corporations, the third and fourth generations can tend to feel distanced from the central management of the company. An annual 'cousins' consortium' can help maintain harmony, explain Bonnie Brown and Chester Weber

November 1, 2004

The Canadian population is made up of a large proportion of baby boomers, and consequently a high percentage of first-generation family businesses. The key challenge for these companies, therefore, is succession. Are they ready? Terri Hegum-Allen reports

Terri Hegum-Allen is national executive director of the Canadian Association of Family Enterprise.

The Canadian population is made up of a large proportion of baby boomers, and consequently a high percentage of first-generation family businesses. The key challenge for these companies, therefore, is succession. Are they ready? Terri Hegum-Allen reports

November 1, 2004

Corporate scions come from a different world, one in which they must prove themselves in the long shadow of their entrepreneurial predecessors and demanding families. It’s a formidable task, as Dennis Jaffe explains

Dennis Jaffe is a founding member of the Aspen Family Business Group.

Corporate scions come from a different world, one in which they must prove themselves in the long shadow of their entrepreneurial predecessors and demanding families. It's a formidable task, as Dennis Jaffe explains

November 1, 2004

Transfer of the family business is a continuing process. One can hire specialists to deal with financial and fiscal-legal regulations but Johan Lambrecht explains why the soft elements of the process must be addressed and fostered by the family

Johan Lambrecht is professor at EHSAL Business School in Brussels and director of the Research Centre for Entrepreneurship, EHSAL-KU Brussels.

Transfer of the family business is a continuing process. One can hire specialists to deal with financial and fiscal-legal regulations but Johan Lambrecht explains why the soft elements of the process must be addressed and fostered by the family

September 1, 2004

Ignoring the strategic landscape of the business itself, family firms can focus too heavily on leadership transition because of emotional reasons, says Andrew Keyt. Has succession overshadowed the harder long-term business goals?

Andrew Keyt is president of the US chapter of the FBN and executive director of the Chicago Family Business Center.

Ignoring the strategic landscape of the business itself, family firms can focus too heavily on leadership transition because of emotional reasons, says Andrew Keyt. Has succession overshadowed the harder long-term business goals?

Click here >>
Close